What is Diabetes Biology for All


What does diabetes mean to you? Something to do with sugar, right? Would you be surprised if I told you that every 6 seconds someone dies from diabetes? One in every 11 adults worldwide has diabetes, and 1 in 2 has not been diagnosed. That is why it is important that we all know what it is, how it can be detected and how we can control it. Diabetes is a condition in which blood glucose levels are too high because the body can not use it properly. This could be because the pancreas does not produce enough insulin or the insulin does not work properly. Insulin helps glucose to leave our blood and enter the cells of our body. Let's look at this process in a little more detail. Your body digests carbohydrates, breaking them down into glucose. Your liver also produces glucose. Insulin is a hormone produced by the pancreas that allows glucose to enter the cells of our body. Here it is used to provide energy to undergo our normal life processes, such as growth and repair. If you have diabetes, your body can not make proper use of this glucose, so it accumulates in the blood and can not be used by the cells. There are two main types of diabetes: type 1 and type 2. Type 1 is when there is no insulin at all, while type 2 is when there is insulin present but there is not enough or it does not work properly. Type 1 diabetes is an autoimmune response, where the body destroys its own insulin-producing cells. This type has nothing to do with diet or lifestyle, and currently there is no cure, just a daily treatment with insulin injections or pumps. The symptoms of type 1 diabetes are thirst, the need to urinate regularly, fatigue and weight loss, and they can appear very suddenly. Without insulin, glucose can not enter cells, so cells can not use it for energy. Therefore, the body has to break down fats to use them as energy and, therefore, to lose weight. Although type 1 diabetes can occur at any age, it usually appears before age 40 and type 1 represents the majority of cases of childhood diabetes. Type 2 diabetes usually appears in people over 40, but it is becoming more common in children and younger people. It represents between 85 and 95 percent of all diabetes and is treated with a healthy diet and regular exercise. Medications and / or insulin are also often used. When the development of type 1 diabetes is usually sudden and dramatic, type 2 symptoms are much milder, making it difficult to detect them. There are some key risk factors associated with type 2 diabetes. Because of the risk factors, you may not be surprised to hear that lifestyle changes can help prevent the development of type 2 diabetes by achieving a healthy body weight. 30 minutes of exercise a day can reduce the risk of developing type 2 diabetes by 40%. Therefore, you should now know the differences between type 1 diabetes and type 2 diabetes, and maintaining a healthy lifestyle can reduce your risk of type 2 diabetes.
I do not own any of the video clips used in this video. The legal rights belong to the holders of legal copyright of said content. I have used them under the "fair use" policy and I have done it for educational and entertainment purposes.

Video credits to Peter Watson YouTube channel





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    What is Diabetes Biology for All

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