Breaking News – Camera that stops diabetes patients from losing a foot


For the thousands of people in the United Kingdom with diabetes, foot ulcers are a big problem: at least one in ten will develop one at some time and a quarter will require the amputation of all or part of the foot. But a new camera could detect these dangerous ulcers before they appear. The device, about the size of a normal camera, has temperature sensors that detect "hot spots" on the feet. These indicate that an ulcer can develop in a few days or weeks. Ulcers are infected sores that develop due to pressure, rubbing or injury. These areas are caused by inflammation under the skin that develops when blood circulation is reduced. Up to 50 percent of patients with diabetes have some type of nerve damage or diabetic neuropathy, where uncontrolled high blood sugar levels damage the walls of the small blood vessels that supply the nerves, especially in the legs. This can lead to symptoms such as loss of sensation and means that patients feel little pain, so the scratches can go unnoticed and become infected. The entire process, from initial damage to amputation, can take less than a week. Detecting the first signs of an ulcer and acting quickly is vital. The only external sign of an approaching ulcer is an increase in temperature in the affected area, as a result of inflammation in response to damage. We know that the foot warms before the skin breaks, "says Professor Michael Edmonds, a consultant diabetologist at King's College Hospital, south London." A difference of more than 2.2 c is a sign that a The ulcer could be developing. "Currently, doctors measure this with an electric thermometer by moving it through several places on each foot and then calculating an average reading." It is very laborious because you only aim at half a square centimeter or less with each measurement, "he explains. Professor Edmonds "It has been so long that it is not done often and we trust our vision and professional experience instead." Here the new camera could help, it has been developed by Rob Simpson, a research scientist at the National Physical Laboratory in London, that studies the thermography, the use of special cameras that detect the temperature to create images, Initially, the technology was used to monitor waste barrels. Nuclear facilities in potentially dangerous areas, and create three-dimensional heat maps of satellites to ensure they can operate at the ends of the space. After talking with medical colleagues, Rob Simpson realized that there could be another application for his cameras: detect the invisible temperature changes that signal foot ulcers before they develop The device takes images in seconds, forming a map of full heat of the entire foot. A doctor points the camera at the patient's feet. The images are displayed on the device's screen and can be loaded into a computer. Hot spots are red or yellow spots. The coldest areas are blue and green. Professor Edmonds has been testing the machine at his diabetic foot clinic at King & # 39; s College Hospital as part of a clinical trial. "With this camera you can get a panoramic view of the entire foot, picking up access points in seconds," he says. "If you see an abnormal area, you can treat it and then re-examine the patient and verify that the treatment has worked." By detecting an early access point, doctors can suggest treatments that can stop the formation of an ulcer. This can be as simple as resting more to relieve pressure on the feet, or using special pads or templates. Patients can receive antibiotics or receive 1

Video credits to US Sciencetech YouTube channel





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    Breaking News – Camera that stops diabetes patients from losing a foot

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